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1913 Albatros

1913 Albatros

The Albatros B.I was a large three-bay biplane designed before the First World War and that was taken into German service after the outbreak of war. It used the composite construction that would be the hallmark of Albatros aircraft. The fuselage had a wooden frame and was covered with plywood. The wings had wooden spars and ribs and were fabric covered. The radiators were mounted on the sides of the fuselage close to the front cockpit.

The aircraft had been designed in 1913, with some input by Ernst Heinkel, who at the time was working for Albatros.

After the outbreak of the First World War the existing biplanes were taken into military service and given the designation B.I. They were then followed by the improved B.II, a two-bay biplane that led onto the armed C.I and a long family of Albatros scouts.

Engine: One Mercedes D.I or D.II
Power: 100hp or 110hp
Span: 47ft 6.75in
Length: 28ft 1.5in
Height: 10ft 4in
Empty weight: 1,647lb
Maximum take-off weight: 2,381lb
Max speed: 65mph
Climbing Speed: 10 minutes to 2,625ft
Endurance: 4 hours
Armament: None

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PT17 Stearman

PT17 Stearman

The importance of the Stearman PT-13/PT-17 to the US war effort cannot be overemphasized. Approximately 50% of all US military pilots, who fought in WW II received their initial flight training in this sturdy aircraft. A further 10,000 RAF and Fleet Air Arm pilots used the Stearman trainer for primary training, at British Flying Training Schools throughout the United States, between 1941 and 1944.

8,430 Stearmans were built before manufacturing ended in 1944. No other biplane was ever produced in such numbers. Over 1,000 Stearman trainers remain in flying condition today.

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The tech people at 2dogrc.com spent many months checking out various battery manufacturers before deciding on a supplier who fully met their tough requirements–a high-end battery that they could sell at low end prices. The result is Mad Dog, a series of batteries available from 2-cells up to 6 and mAh all the way up to 5100 and discharge rates from 20C to 35C with a charge rate of 3C. One of the demands 2dogrc.com placed on their supplier was that each pack must contain  synchronized cells, meaning matched internal resistance. 2dogrc.com has run over 300 tests on their new Mad Dog packs and are willing to share the results with you. Just visit their website.

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wp0_wpb44b7019_05If you are one of those modelers who have stuck with the less reliable BECs because of your concerns over RX battery weight, your concerns are now over. These new 2100mAh, 20C, 6.6 volt  LiFe receiver batteries fromDymond Model Sports weigh in at only 3.8 oz. They measure 4-1/4” long, 2” tall,  only 3/8” thick and  represent the very latest is LiFe technology.  They  can be charged at the field in 10-15 minutes.

 Dymond Model Sports also offers LiFes to fit your transmitter that will last for weeks of flying without recharging. The battery can stay in the radio and can be charged with Dymond’s inexpensive  3 S automatic LiFe wall charger–only $ 9.95. The transmitter batteries do not have to be balanced, as the amp draw of the TX is very low and would not unbalance a battery. Visit Dymond’s website.

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F6F Hellcat

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was a carrier-based fighter aircraft conceived to replace the earlier F4F Wildcat in United States Navy (USN) service. The Hellcat was an erstwhile rival of the faster Vought F4U Corsair for use as a carrier based fighter. However, the Corsair had significant issues with carrier landing that the Hellcat did not, allowing the Hellcat to steal a march as the Navy’s dominant fighter in the second part of World War II, a position the Hellcat did not relinquish. The Corsair instead was primarily deployed to great effect in land-based use by the U.S. Marine Corps.

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Albatros

Albatros

The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) and the Austro-Hungarian Air Service (Luftfahrtruppen) during World War I. The D.III was flown by many top German aces, including Manfred von Richthofen, Ernst Udet, Erich Löwenhardt, Kurt Wolff, and Karl Emil Schäfer. It was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as “Bloody April”

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